The Secret Diplomacy of England

The following article by Roger Casement on ‘The Secret Diplomacy of England’ was found by Angus Mitchell and supplied to the RIA in 2000. Angus Mitchell’s recent book ‘One Bold Deed of Open Treason – The Berlin Diary of Roger Casement 1914-1916’ makes fascinating reading and is very enlightening about Casement’s thoughts, many of which he […]

Casement on the Greek Tragedy

The following article was written by Roger Casement in November 1915 for The Continental Times of Berlin. It is just one of a series he composed that have lain neglected for over a century. Some of them will appear for the first time since original publication in 1915-16, in a special edition of Irish Foreign […]

Britain and Germany (1915)

Germany of To-day (1915) by George Stuart Fullerton, Professor of Philosophy in Columbia University, New York, is an interesting book. It is a defence of Germany against the flood of Wellington House propaganda that was deluging the United States during 1914-15. It was written by an American from a German internment camp. In August 1914, while an […]

Sir Roger Casement, Denialist

Sir Roger Casement wrote on October 11th 1915: “A fresh ‘Armenian Massacre’ having been deftly provoked by a conspiracy engineered from the British Embassy at Constantinople, whereby English arms, money and uniforms, were to be furnished to the Armenians on condition that they rose against the Turkish Government, England now turns to the humanitarian impulse […]

Trois: Ah! Ne me brouillez pas avec la République!

Andre Siegfried noticed the peculiar relationship between Britain and the United States which was developing after the Great War victory over Germany. England, which had always fought to establish and defend its supremacy in the world, was now seeking collaboration with another power in its post-War world. It was doing so through a tacit accord with […]

Deux: Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

“Since in the domain of foreign affairs Great Britain spoke for her whole Empire, and since the seas of the world were controlled by the unchallenged strength of the British Navy, the influence of Europe was predominant over the whole globe, while at the same time no world war was possible without British intervention.” (G.M. […]

Un: L’Angleterre d’aujourd’hui

“When circumstances alter, the British have the gift of adapting themselves very quickly to new conditions without dwelling upon what is past. Old principles, old ideas, old memories do not influence them. It is, however, very disconcerting to those of their associates who cannot change their attitude with the same facility.” (L’Angleterre d’aujourd’hui, p.19) So […]