V. Centenary of the Balfour Declaration 1917

Britain, through the Balfour Declaration of 1917, was entirely responsible for the success of the Zionist movement in establishing itself to the great detriment of the native inhabitants of Palestine. A generation ago this was freely admitted in England.  For instance a popular book by James Williamson, that went to 6 editions, A Short History […]

IV. Balfour Declaration – Taming the Jew

Britain did not have a Jewish problem to the extent of other European countries but in the course of its Great War it began to see itself as having an international Jewish problem that obstructed the winning of its War over Germany and the Ottoman Turks. That is the fundamental reason for the Balfour Declaration […]

III. Strategic Aspects of the Balfour Declaration

In March 1915 Britain reversed its Foreign Policy of nearly a century and consented to Russia’s possession of Constantinople/Istanbul after the War. This was done to secure the continued services of the Russian Steamroller in the field and dissuade the Tsar of any thoughts he might have of making peace with the Kaiser. To secure […]

CENTENARY OF POPE BENEDICT’S LOST PEACE

This month marks the centenary of Pope Benedict XV’s attempt to stop the Great War in 1917. It was the Pope’s final great effort to halt the catastrophe that was destroying Christian Europe, as well as destabilising its Moslem hinterland. He failed against Britain’s determination to see the Great War it had launched through to […]

On Democratic War

Editorial from Church & State An Irish History Magazine Third Quarter 2017: The Irish Government facilitated the destruction of the liberal, secular State of Iraq by American and British military action. It refuelled American war-planes at Shannon. Government spokesman, Martin Mansergh, explained that its policy was determined by a judicious combination of practicality and idealism. […]

North Korea Offensive

Editorial from The Irish Political Review May 2017: North Korea is the last of the Cold War states—that is, the last of the states left behind by Britain’s Second World War: that is, the war on Germany that Britain declared in 1939, expanded into a World War by use of its Navy when defeated in […]

Trois: Ah! Ne me brouillez pas avec la République!

Andre Siegfried noticed the peculiar relationship between Britain and the United States which was developing after the Great War victory over Germany. England, which had always fought to establish and defend its supremacy in the world, was now seeking collaboration with another power in its post-War world. It was doing so through a tacit accord with […]